Landmarks

Palacio Salvo

Palacio Salvo

This is one of the preferred targets for tourist photos. It is an art deco building that dates back to 1928 and at 105 meters high it was – until the middle of the 1930s – the tallest building in South America. Where it stands was the confectionary where La Cumparsita, the most well-known tango worldwide, was first played. Address: Independencia and 18 de Julio streets.

Solís Theater

Solís Theater

The most famous stage in the city is, without doubt, the Solís theatre. The building inaugurated in 1856 does not only attract people for its history; as it has been host to several mythical artists such Vaslaw Nijinski, Enrico Caruso, Arthur Rubinstein, Sarah Bernhardt, amongst others; but also for its architectural beauty. In fact, there is the possibility of taking a guided tour. They have different kinds of tours some them are dedicated to the history, others are centered on the masonic symbology associated with the building.
(www.teatrosolis.org.uy)

Artigas Mausoleum

Artigas Mausoleum

Plaza Independencia is one of the places tourists prefer to immortalize their stay in Montevideo. One of the obligatory visits is to the José Gervasio Artigas mausoleum. There in a solemn atmosphere the remains of the national hero rest. It is a minimalist work in granite where around the urn are some of the mottos of the Artiguista ideology. In front of the square is the Executive Office of the Uruguayan President and the Palacio Salvo.

Puerta de la Ciudadela – City Gateway

Puerta de la Ciudadela – City Gateway

Located next to Plaza Independencia, it is one of the last vestiges of the old wall that surrounded the colonial city. What we see today is actually a restored version of the original door.

Metropolitan Catheral

Metropolitan Catheral

The main Catholic temple in Montevideo is in front of Plaza Matriz. The first church was built in 1740 which later gave rise to this, more ambitious, construction in whose interior high quality religious images can be found.

Castillo Pittamiglio –Pittamiglio Castle

Castillo Pittamiglio –Pittamiglio Castle

The Castillo Pittamiglio in Montevideo was created by the architect Humberto Pittamiglio, the same one who built a castle close to Piriápolis. The distinctive part of the construction is the facade in the form of a boat that looks out towards the Rambla. However, the most interesting is the intricate interior design, where there is an abundance of symbols and references to alchemy. Interesting guided tours are organized here.
(http://www.castillopittamiglio.org/)

Palacio Legislativo

Palacio Legislativo

The seat of the Uruguayan legislative power is one of the architectural jewels of Montevideo. This great work constructed in marble was inaugurated in 1925 and is surprising not only for its neoclassical architecture, but also for the richness of its interior decoration. In this venue, where the Senate and the Members of Parliament sit, you can also find one of the most important libraries in the country. There are guided visits from Monday to Friday in several languages. Address: Av. de las Leyes Telephone: 142; extension 2528/2781.
(www.parlamento.gub.uy)

Estadio Centenario – Centenario Stadium

Estadio Centenario – Centenario Stadium

Soccer is part of a Uruguayan’s DNA and a visit to Montevideo would not be complete without a visit to Estadio Centenario and its Soccer Museum. The first aim is to visit the mythical sport field (located in Parque Batlle) where the first final of the World Cup was played. This monumental work was erected in the record time of nine months and was inaugurated on July 18, 1930, coinciding with the first centenary of the swearing of the first Uruguayan constitution; hence its name.